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Australia's Gillard dragged from protest
Prime Minister Julia Gillard rushed to safety after becoming trapped in Aborigines' protest against Australia Day.
Last Modified: 26 Jan 2012 16:07

Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard has been dragged to safety by a personal security guard during angry protest in Canberra against the celebration of Australia's national day.

Gillard stumbled and was caught by the security guard as riot police helped her force a path through a crowd of rowdy protesters at a Australia Day ceremony on Thursday.

She appeared distressed as she was pulled away from the protesters but was unharmed. She later remarked that she was made of "pretty tough stuff" and commended police for their actions.

Some 200 supporters of indigenous rights had surrounded a Canberra restaurant and banged its windows while Gillard and opposition leader Tony Abbott were inside officiating at an award ceremony. Around 50 police escorted the political leaders from a side door to a car.

Gillard stumbled, losing a shoe. Her personal security guard wrapped his arms around her and supported her to the waiting car, shielding her from the angry crowd.

Reactions mixed

The protesters had been demonstrating for indigenous rights nearby at the so-called Aboriginal Tent Embassy, a ramshackle collection of tents and temporary shelters in the national capital that is a center point of protests against Australia Day.

Australia Day marks the arrival of the first fleet of British colonists in Sydney on January 26, 1788. Many Aborigines call it Invasion Day because the land was settled without a treaty with traditional owners.

Abbott appeared to be the target of protesters, who chanted "shame" and "racist" outside the restaurant. The Tent Embassy celebrated its 40th anniversary on Thursday.

Abbott had earlier angered indigenous activists by saying it was time the embassy "moved on". Gillard was unharmed and later hosted another Australia Day function for foreign ambassadors at her official residence.

"The only thing that angers me is that it distracted from such a wonderful event," Gillard told reporters. "I am made of pretty tough stuff and the police did a great job," she added.

Reaction from protesters afterward was mixed, with some saying police assaulted them and that Gillard and Abbott were never in danger.

They also made conflicting claims over who had Gillard's shoe, a Midas high-heel made of blue suede, and if it would be returned.

Source:
Agencies
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