[QODLink]
Asia-Pacific
Qantas and unions still at loggerheads
Industrial dispute between Australian airline and staff set to be referred to arbitration committee as talks stall.
Last Modified: 21 Nov 2011 11:36
 Qantas flights were grounded for two days last month as a consequence of the industrial dispute [EPA]

An industrial dispute between Qantas and unions representing the Australian airline's employees is to be referred to an arbitration committee after the talks between the two sides collapsed.

Negotiators have been attempting to settle the long-running wage dispute prior to a Monday deadline imposed after a worker lockout by the airline last month resulted in all Qantas flights being grounded for two days.

The dispute, which pits the airline against 3,800 pilots, baggage workers, and caterers over its plans to lower operating costs, will now be referred to the Fair Work Australia arbitration board.

"We asked for a 21-day extension. We thought a negotiated outcome was possible, but they (Qantas) turned that down," said Anil Lambert, a spokesperson for the Australian and International Pilots Association who spoke to Thomson Reuters.

A spokesperson for the Transport Workers Union said Qantas was deliberately trying to stall talks, a move they said would work in management's favour.

"Our fear is that Qantas will drag this out for as long as it can," the spokesperson told the Reuters news agency.

For its part, the airline rejected claims that it had terminated negotiations.

In a statement to the press, it said: "after six months of negotiations including over 20 meetings, extending the talks by three weeks would not help us reach an agreement. We want to provide certainty for our customers and bring this issue to a close as quickly as possible."

Australia's national airline first angered unions in August when it unveiled plans to shift some of its operations outside of thje country, which unions said would cost 1,000 local jobs.

Hoping to cut costs, Qantas wants to set up two Asia-based airlines in an effort to turn around losses last year in its international business of $200 million.

Qantas said last month's grounding resulted in a loss of $68.4 million and led to a collapse in forward bookings.

The disputes have also affected the airline's stock prices. So far this year, shares of the company have fallen by a third. This downward trend continued on Monday when the stock closed the day down 1.2 per cent.

Since neither side can take any industrial actions during the arbitration, the airline has re-assured customers that flights will not be affected by the on-going negotiations.

“Qantas customers have returned in large numbers since we resumed flying and they can continue to book flights with absolute confidence,” said Chief Executive Officer, Alan Joyce.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Private citizens take initiative to help 'irregular' migrants, accusing governments of excessive focus on security.
Indonesia's cassava plantations are being killed by mealybugs, and thousands of wasps have been released to stop them.
Violence in Ain al-Arab has prompted many Kurdish Syrians to flee to Turkey, but others are returning to battle ISIL.
Unelected representatives quietly iron out logistics of massive TPP and TTIP deals among US, Europe, and Asia-Pacific.
Led by students concerned for their future with 'nothing to lose', it remains to be seen who will blink first.