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'Terror suspects' shot in Indonesia
Alleged bomb-maker wanted for the 2002 Bali bombings believed to be among the dead.
Last Modified: 09 Mar 2010 18:43 GMT
 Police have detained at least 24 suspects in Java and Aceh since February 22 [AFP]

Indonesian police have killed three suspected terrorists in two separate raids near the capital Jakarta.

According to a police spokesman on Tuesday, an alleged bomb-maker named Dulmatin -  wanted in connection with the 2002 Bali bombings - is believed to have been among those killed.

Major General Edward Aritonang said the first suspect was killed after he shot at police in a raid on an Internet cafe southwest of the country's capital on the main Indonesian island of Java .

Aritonang added that suspect had fired a single shot from a revolver before he died.

Police crackdown

Local media said the suspect was believed to be Dulmatin, a possible mastermind behind the bombings of Bali nightclubs that killed 202 people.

Dulmatin, an electronics specialist with training from al-Qaeda camps in Afghanistan, was thought to have fled to the Philippines. Like many Indonesians, he uses one name.

However, Aritonang said authorities were still trying to determine the identity of the suspect.

"We will announce who he is as soon as police identify him," Aritonang said.

Police later shot and killed two suspects as they fled on a house where two others were arrested, Aritonang said. One of those killed had been firing a handgun.

Aritonang said another terror suspect had been arrested in Jakarta on Tuesday before the two raids, bringing to 24 the number of suspects taken into custody in Java and Aceh since February 22 in a police crackdown on a suspected Jemaah Islamiyah (JI) cell in Aceh.

Aritonang said the raids on Tuesday were based on information gleaned from those already arrested.

Source:
Agencies
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