Seoul seeks flood talks with North

South Korea seeks talks on cross-border river control following deadly flood surge.

    Last month's sudden surge in water along the Imjin river killed six South Korean campers [AFP]

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    The rapid rise in water levels along the Imjin river on 6 September occurred after the North abruptly released a massive amount of water from an upriver dam.

    No advance warning was given of the release, which sent a surge of water across the heavily-fortified border between the two Koreas.

    Shortly afterwards North Korea said it "urgently" had to open sluice gates because levels behind a dam on the river had become dangerously high.

    The release caused the water levels in the river to almost double in a matter of minutes, sweeping to their deaths six South Koreans who were camping downstream and casting a cloud over recent improvements in inter-Korean relations.

    North and South Korea remain technically at war, never having signed a peace treaty formally ending the 1950-53 Korean War.

    The two sides last held formal talks in August, during which they agreed to resume a stalled programme of family reunions.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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