[QODLink]
Asia-Pacific
Myanmar refugees wary of return
Refugees begin returning from Chinese border town amid fears of ongoing conflict.
Last Modified: 31 Aug 2009 09:34 GMT
Many refugees are afraid to return to Myanmar due to fears of continued conflict [AFP]

Refugees who fled fierce clashes between the Myanmar military and rebels in the northeast of the country have said they fear returning home because of possible reprisals by government troops.

An estimated 37,000 refugees had streamed across the border into China's Yunnan province in recent days, Chinese officials have said, following days of fighting in Kokang, a mainly ethnic Chinese region of Myanmar's Shan state.

Eight rebel fighters and 26 security forces were killed in the clashes, state media in Myanmar reported on Sunday, adding that the unrest had ended.

Two Chinese nationals were also killed, officials said.

At a border crossing in the Chinese town of Nansan, refugees were crossing back into Myanmar on Monday in groups of about 40 at a time.

"The Myanmar government has told us through diplomatic channels to send them back," Li Hui, a spokesman for the Yunnan government told reporters.

"Those who want to go back can return. We are finding that most of these people want to go back to their homes," he said.

"The Myanmar government is saying that it is calm over there. From what we see, we don't think that there is any armed fighting."

But many refugees said they were unconvinced by the government's claims that calm had been restored in Kokang.

'Afraid'

"They were shooting ordinary people. I saw it myself. We don't believe what they say. We are afraid to go back," said 24-year-old farmer Li Jun.

"They say they will not shoot again but they will shoot."

Rows of blue tents had been set up in Nansan to accommodate the refugees.

Li said 13,000 refugees were staying in camps, while 10,000-20,000 more were believed to be living with friends and relatives in and around the town.

China is one of the few allies of Myanmar's, providing the country's ruling generals with military hardware and is a major consumer of Myanmar's natural resources.

However Larry Jagan, a Myanmar analyst, told Al Jazeera that China has grown increasingly worried over the conflicts in Myanmar.

"While China continues its policy of non-interference, it has shown and expressed its concern to the ruling generals in Myanmar that it wants a stable neighbour," he said.

The Kokang rebels - known as the Myanmar National Democratic Alliance Army -agreed to a ceasefire with the government in 1989 after fighting for autonomy in the region.

However, Myanmar's military government has recently stepped up efforts to secure the support of ethnic minorities and political groups ahead of national elections due some time next year.

Widening conflict

Over 30,000 refugees poured into China from Myanmar's Shan state [Reuters]

It wants to co-opt armed ethnic minorities living on the borders of China and Thailand.

These groups have long fought for independence, but between 15 and 20 years ago, the central government signed cease-fire agreements with many of them.

Now it wants to completely absorb those rebel groups, finally ending their push for autonomy.

Many analysts fear this latest flare-up with ethnic Chinese Kokang fighters could spread to draw in the Wa and Kachin ethnic groups, both of which are heavily armed.

Myanmar's other major internal conflict is with the Karen on the border with Thailand.
 
Until June, The Karen National Union rebel group controlled much of the border with Thailand. But a major push by the military that month overran seven major camps.

That resulted in around 5,000 people fleeing into Thailand.

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
Topics in this article
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Mehdi Hasan discusses online freedoms and the potential of the web with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.
A tight race seems likely as 814 million voters elect leaders in world's largest democracy next week.
Featured
Activists say 'Honor Diaries' documentary exploits gender-based violence to further an anti-Islamic agenda.
As Syria's civil war escalates along the Turkish border, many in Turkey are questioning the country's involvement.
Treatment for autism in the region has progressed, but lack of awareness and support services remains a challenge.
The past isn't far away for a people exiled from Crimea by Russia and the decades it took to get home.
New report highlights plight of domestic helpers in the United Kingdom, with critics comparing it to kefala system.
join our mailing list