GM China unit 'still growing'

GM's Chinese operations to be "unaffected" by parent company's failure.

    Wale said GM China's business plans have been protected amid the collapse of its US operations [EPA]

    "We do not see any change to our growth activities."

    Strong demand

    GM is one of the biggest vehicle-makers in China, where strong sales have been a bright spot for global manufacturers as demand plummets elsewhere.

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    China's monthly sales have surpassed those of the United States so far this year.

    GM China's sales have soared in the first five months of 2009, rising by 33 per cent when compared to the same period of 2008. In May alone they sold 156,000 units.

    Demand is so strong that GM China expects to add a factory within five years, but has made no decisions about a location or other details, Wale said.

    Wale said GM expects strong sales to continue for at least the next two
    months, but conditions after that are uncertain.

    "You never know what is in front of us. So we prefer to be a little prudent at this stage," he said.

    China is GM's second-largest national market after the US, followed by Brazil, the United Kingdom, Canada, Russia and Germany.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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