The court also accepted the charge levelled against two of Suu Kyi's companions and John Yettaw, and American man whose intrusion into Suu Kyi's lakeside home triggered the case.

'Anti-government forces'

Yettaw's visit has begun a storm of speculation in Myanmar, with some of those supporting Suu Kyi suggesting Yettaw's visit was set up by the country's military government precisely so they could extend her house arrest, due to expire on May 27.

But a senior government official said that a plot by "anti-government forces" was behind the visit.

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According to the state-run New Light of Myanmar, Nyan Win, the foreign minister, told his Japanese counterpart that the incident was organised by "internal and external anti-government forces", a term the government usually uses to refer to pro-democracy groups.

Friday was the fifth day of Suu Kyi's trial, which is being held behind closed doors at Yangon's Insein prison.

Suu Kyi has been in detention without trial for more than 13 of the past 19 years.

Due to Yettaw's visit she has been charged with allowing a visitor to stay at her home without official permission - an offence punishable by up to five years imprisonment.

On Wednesday, the court was shown a video Yettaw allegedly shot at Suu Kyi's home.

The video had a voice-over, apparently by Yettaw, which was translated into the local language in the courtroom, Nyan Win, one of the opposition leader's lawyers - not related to the foreign minister - said.

Suu Kyi's lawyers have also said that she told Yettaw to leave, but that she allowed him to stay for two days after he pleaded that he was too ill and tired to return across the lake.