Seeking to reassure the Thai people, Abhisit unveiled a training programme for the unemployed to learn computer and service industry skills, and said some may also receive start-up funding after the courses.

"It will help restructure the economy in our country," he said. "The economic structure in many provinces will expand and grow."

The government will also launch several more stimulus packages, following an earlier $3.3bn injection into the economy, he said.

'Stable' situation

He also outlined plans to obtain around $2bn in foreign loans to fund transportation, education and healthcare projects.

"The political situation has become more stable [and] the international community understands our country better," Abhisit said, praising his government's progress so far.

"But right now I still cannot be happy because we still have to solve a lot of economic problems."

Thailand has seen a series of bitter political tussles that has divided the Southeast Asian kingdom in recent years.

Last year, a string of corruption charges and months of protests by supporters of Abhisit's party forced two prime ministers to resign.

Abhisit's government took control after a court ruled that the previous ruling party was guilty of election fraud.

Critics allege Abhisit's appointment followed pressure from the military and other unelected groups.