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Bali bombers' appeal rejected
Appeals by three men convicted over the 2002 Bali attack have been rejected.
Last Modified: 18 Jul 2008 01:39 GMT
The bombings killed 202 people, mostly Western tourists [Al Jazeera]

An Indonesian court has rejected the final appeals of three men sentenced to death over the 2002 Bali bombings, in which 202 people died.

Nyoman Gede Wirya, the Denpasar district court head, said on Thursday: "The supreme court explained that an appeal for a judicial review is only allowed once, which means their request could not be processed."

The court had already dismissed two other petitions to review their cases.

Ali Ghufron, Imam Samudra and Amrozi Nurhasyim would be formally asked if they want to appeal to the president for clemency as their only remaining way to avoid the death sentence.

The three men have repeatedly said they would not seek clemency because such a request has to be accompanied by an admission of wrongdoing.

The three men - Amrozi, Ali Gufron and Imam Samudra - were sentenced to death in autumn 2003 for their part in the bombings, which killed 202 people, most of them Western tourists.

The men have said the attacks were in revenge for Muslim deaths in Afghanistan and elsewhere and that they were sanctioned under their interpretation of Islam.

Indonesia never reveals when executions are going to take place in advance, and there were no indications on Thursday that their deaths were imminent.

Mohammad Mahendradata, the men's lawyer, said he had yet to be informed of the court's decision.

He said he would attempt to challenge it further, but gave no more details.

Source:
Agencies
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