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By-election tests Hong Kong's mood
Pro-democracy camp looks for a boost from contest pitting two former civil servants.
Last Modified: 02 Dec 2007 10:36 GMT
Chan has emerged from retirement, disillusioned by the slow pace of Hong Kong's political reform [Getty]

Residents of Hong Kong have voted in a legislative by-election which is being compared to a referendum on democracy in the city that returned to Chinese rule 10 years ago.
 
Sunday's contest pitted Anson Chan and Regina Ip - two former civil servants against each other - and sparked scuffles between supporters from the two camps.
The final result will not change the balance of power within the 60-member Legislative Council (Legco), but is likely to be widely interpreted as an indicator of the political preferences of Hong Kong people.
The pro-democracy camp is looking for a boost from Chan, 67, the front-runner in public opinion polls, after a drubbing in district council elections last month at the hands of the biggest pro-Beijing party.
 
Universal suffrage
 
Chan made a name for herself as the first Chinese, first female head of the civil service under British rule, and she emerged from retirement a year ago to press for universal suffrage, disillusioned by the slow pace of reform.
As security chief in 2003, Ip tried to force an
anti-subversion law through legislature [AFP]

Ip, 57, enjoys the support of the city's powerful pro-establishment constituency, which is content to let Beijing decide when and how democracy should be expanded.
 
Ip is perhaps best known for trying to force an unpopular anti-subversion law through the city legislature in 2003 when security chief.
 
That attempt is widely blamed for sparking a protest that drew half a million people into the streets, shocking leaders in Beijing.
 
Currently, Hong Kong's leader, the chief executive, is picked by an 800-seat committee under the influence of the Communist leadership in Beijing.
 
Constituencies
 
Half of the legislature is popularly elected, the other picked by "functional constituencies".
 
The city's constitution states that universal suffrage is the ultimate aim of political reform, but is vague on the timing and roadmap. Analysts say Beijing wants to delay as long as possible.
 
Chan and Ip both say they favour the introduction of universal suffrage by the next chief executive election, which is in 2012, but they differ on important technicalities, including how candidates could be nominated.
 
Analysts say a decisive win by Chan could give the democratic camp a boost in the run-up to a full Legco election next year.
Source:
Agencies
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