[QODLink]
Asia-Pacific
Seoul hunts toxic ship and crew
Ship carrying 2,000 tonnes of nitric acid believed sunk and sailors feared dead.
Last Modified: 26 Dec 2007 06:21 GMT
A 28-year-old sailor from Myanmar is the only survivor so far [Reuters]
South Korea's coast guard has dispatched boats and helicopters to continue the search for a ship carrying toxic cargo and 14 crew members who are feared dead.
 
The ship, carrying 2,000 tonnes of nitric acid, went missing after it sent out a distress signal early on Tuesday off Yeosu, 455km south of Seoul.
One sailor was rescued but the remaining 14 crew members had yet to be located and were feared dead in the chilly waters after the cargo ship was thought to have sunk.
 
Kang Byung-mun, a spokesman, said the coast guard believed the ship had sunk.

"Unfortunately, we didn't find any survivors," he said after overnight search and rescue attempts. 

 

The freighter left Yeosu on Monday night and was bound for Taiwan, carrying the acid for a logistics company.

 

The nitric acid on board, though toxic, "would likely be kept in the ship's storage facilities, which have good safety devices", an official said on condition of anonymity.

 

It was also not likely to cause environmental damage because it easily dilutes, the official said.

 

The survivor, a 28-year-old sailor from Myanmar, told investigators he watched the vessel sink before he and the other crew members - 12 South Koreans and two from Myanmar, were swept away, Kang said.

 

Oil spill tanker seized

 

The news comes as a South Korean government-affiliated pollution agency seized the Hong Kong-registered tanker behind the country's worst oil spill more than two weeks ago.

 

The move is an attempt to force the vessel's owners to pay for the clean-up of more than 10,000 tonnes of crude oil that leaked from the tanker.

 

More than 10,000 tonnes of crude oil
leaked from the Hebei Spirit tanker [AFP]
The oil spill occurred when a sea-bound crane mounted on a Samsung Heavy Industries barge punched holes in the tanker on December 7.

 

"We impounded the ship in order to receive compensation for the expenses of controlling the oil spill," said an official at the government-linked Korea Marine Pollution Response Corp.

 

The South Korean government has yet to release a damage estimate or say how much the clean-up will cost.

 

Residents say their livelihoods have been ruined because the spill wiped out fisheries and the tourism industry dried up.

 

Earlier this week, South Korean officials arrested a tugboat captain and barge commander and plan to indict them on negligence and pollution charges early next year, a coast guard official said.

 

Last week, the coast guard said it was seeking arrest warrants for four people: the captain of the Hebei Spirit tanker, the captains of two tugboats towing the barge and the person responsible for the crane mounted on the barge.

 

On the advice of prosecutors, the coast guard later decided not to arrest the Hebei Spirit captain and the second tugboat captain.

 

Conservationists fear the oil spill will
cause problems for years [Reuters]
Both were still being investigated for possible criminal negligence, the coast guard official said.

 

The tugboat captains and barge commander are suspected of taking the crane out in rough waters despite warnings not to do so, local media reported.

 

A towline between the crane and one of the tugboats severed about 15 minutes before the accident and the tanker did not move out of the way in time, a coast guard report said.

 

Most of the oil has now been cleared from South Korea's beaches after tens of thousands of volunteers joined the effort.

 

But conservationists fear the oil that has sunk to the seabed will cause problems for years.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
More than one-quarter of Gaza's population has been displaced, causing a humanitarian crisis.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Muslim charities claim discrimination after major UK banks began closing their accounts.
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Featured
Lawsuit by 6-year-old girl, locked up for a year, reignites debate over indefinite detention of 'boat people'.
Indonesian and Malaysian authorities are keeping a close eye on local supporters of the hard-line Middle East group.
Citizens of the tiny African nation say they're increasingly anxious of the fallout after alleged coup.
A humanitarian crisis and a budget crisis converge in the heart of the human smuggling corridor in Texas.
Assam officials upset that WWII-era Stillwell Road won't be used in transnational highway linking four Asian nations.
join our mailing list