[QODLink]
Asia-Pacific
Nepal party against monarchy
Nepali Congress approves resolution to declare the country a republic.
Last Modified: 26 Sep 2007 16:58 GMT

Maoist leaders withdrew from the ruling coalition after they demanded the monarchy be abolished [EPA]

Nepali Congress, the Himalayan kingdom's biggest political party, has endorsed a plan to declare the country a republic ahead of elections this year, party officials have said.
 
Leaders of the Nepali Congress approved the plan on Wednesday, virtually sealing the fate of the monarchy.
Ram Chandra Poudel, a senior leader of the centrist Nepali Congress party, said: "The general convention of the party formally approved the political resolution and our election manifesto which promises to turn Nepal into a federal republic."
"This means we will not support the monarchy any more," Poudel, who is also peace and reconstruction minister, said.

Sushil Koirala, acting president of Nepali Congress, said the decision came a week after the Maoists withdrew from the ruling coalition after they demanded the monarchy be abolished.
 
The Maoists waged a decade-long armed rebellion to turn Nepal into a republic before joining the government this year.
 
Nepali Congress leaders said they hoped the move would pave the way for the Maoists to return to the political mainstream in time for the November vote to elect a special assembly to draft a new constitution.
 
The Maoists have signalled they would be open to reconciliation.

Unpopular king

King Gyanendra has been unpopular since he came to the throne in 2001 after a massacre in the royal palace left his brother, King Birendra, and nine other royals dead.

Gyanendra seized absolute power in 2005, saying he would bring order to a chaotic political scene and quell the Maoist insurgency that had killed nearly 13,000 people.

But the political and economic climate worsened, and widespread discontent led to nearly a month of protests across the country that ultimately forced Gyanendra to end his royal dictatorship. The king currently holds no real power.

The government has meanwhile nationalised 12 royal palaces. A government committee has also been trying to catalogue the king's property and assets - which are said to be substantial and well-hidden.

Authorities have also cut off the king's annual allowance of 2.7 million rupees ($500,000).

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Private citizens take initiative to help 'irregular' migrants, accusing governments of excessive focus on security.
Indonesia's cassava plantations are being killed by mealybugs, and thousands of wasps will be released to stop them.
Violence in Ain al-Arab has prompted many Kurdish Syrians to flee to Turkey, but others are returning to battle ISIL.
Unelected representatives quietly iron out logistics of massive TPP and TTIP deals among US, Europe, and Asia-Pacific.
Led by students concerned for their future with 'nothing to lose', it remains to be seen who will blink first.