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Mahathir cleared after heart attack
Former Malaysian PM leaves hospital after second heart attack in less than a year.
Last Modified: 24 May 2007 08:52 GMT
Mahathir has said he will cut back his
schedule on medical advice [Reuters]
Mahathir Mohamad, the former Malaysian prime minister, has been released from hospital after recovering from what medical officials said was his second heart attack in seven months.
 
Mahathir, 81, was hospitalised on May 14 while holidaying on the resort island of Langkawi, and was later moved to the National Heart Institute in Kuala Lumpur.
Initially, his condition was described by family members as the effects of exhaustion and his previous medical condition.
 
But physicians later said he suffered breathing problems caused by lung congestion associated with a heart attack.
Mahathir was discharged Thursday after doctors determined he was in no further danger, said Alawiyah Yussof, a spokeswoman for the National Heart Institute.
 

The former leader, who travels regularly for speaking engagements, said last week he would cut back his hectic schedule on his doctors' advice.

 

Mahathir led Malaysia for 22 years until 2003 and stepped down after hand-picking Abdullah Ahmad Badawi to replace him.

 

But last year, Mahathir began attacking Abdullah, accusing him of corruption, nepotism and mismanaging the economy.

Source:
Agencies
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