[QODLink]
Asia-Pacific
Three-way tie in E Timor polls
With 70 per cent of votes counted, officials say second round run-off is likely.
Last Modified: 11 Apr 2007 06:15 GMT
Ramos-Horta, who many had expected to win easily, is only slightly ahead in the polls [Reuters]
A run-off will be needed to decide the winner of East Timor's presidential election after preliminary results released by the National Election Commission showed a three-way tie for the lead.
 
With 70 per cent of vote counted, Jose Ramos-Horta, Francisco "Lu-Olo" Guterres and Fernando "Lasama" de Araujo were in a virtual dead heat on Wednesday.
Ramos-Horta, the prime minister, got 21.75 per cent, de Araujo, the former resistance leader, 21.73 per cent and Guterres of the Fretilin party 21.39 per cent, according to the commission.
 
While Ramos-Horta was far ahead in the capital, Dili, Guterres received strong support in the rural areas.
Martinho Gusmao, spokesman for the commission, said: "With this percentage, there will probably be a second round."
 
A majority of at least one vote above 50 per cent is needed to win and if the figures do not change significantly, a run-off will be held on May 8 between the top two candidates.
 
A final tally is due to be released on April 19, if there is no appeal.
 
Bigger plans
 
The election is seen as a gauge of support for a plan by Ramos-Horta and his close ally, Xanana Gusmao, the outgoing president who will run for the more powerful post of prime minister in June general elections, to seize control of parliament from the Fretilin party.
 
Fretilin official Jose Manuel Fernandes said their own tally from polling stations nationwide showed 40 per cent of votes counted had gone to their candidate.
 
Ramos-Horta won the 1996 Nobel Peace Prize for championing East Timor's struggle to end decades of brutal Indonesian rule.
 
Although by far the best-known of the eight candidates, turnout at his recent election campaign rallies was lower than expected.
 
East Timor declared independence from Indonesia in 2002 but descended into chaos last year after Mari Alkatiri, the then-prime minister, fired 600 soldiers - about one-third of the country's army - provoking gun battles between rival security forces that spiralled into gang warfare and looting.
 
At least 37 people were killed and some 155,000 displaced before the government collapsed.
 
Tens of thousands of refugees have yet to return home, and the country remains desperately poor, with a 50 per cent unemployment rate.
 
East Timor was a Portuguese colony for more than three centuries before it was invaded by Indonesia in 1976.
 
Guerrillas spent the next 24 years fighting the occupation, a struggle Ramos-Horta championed from exile.
 
In the country's first election for independence in 1999, Indonesian troops and their militia allies killed more than 1,000 people and burned hundreds of homes and businesses.
Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.
Public stripping and assault of woman and rival protests thereafter highlight Kenya's gender-relations divide.