[QODLink]
Asia-Pacific
Group releases Philippine hostages
General denies that he was abducted in the first place.
Last Modified: 05 Feb 2007 03:13 GMT
Dolorfino and Santos had flown in on Friday morning for talks with the MNLF [AFP]
Muslim rebels have released a senior Philippine general, a government official and their aides after holding them for two nights in their camp on a remote southern island.
 
On Sunday, brigadier-general Ben Dolorfino, commander of military forces in Manila, said: "I'm OK. I'm glad this crisis is over."
Dolorfino, a Muslim convert, insisted he and Ramon Santos, head of the government's truce panel, were not hostages of the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) because they were not disarmed and were allowed to use their mobile phones.
 
"We agreed to the invitation to stay for a while," he said.
The MNLF was formed to seek autonomy for the Philippines' Muslim-majority Moro state in a country that is predominantly Christian.
 
Dolorfino and Santos had flown in on Friday morning for talks with the MNLF about a shaky 1996 peace agreement and clashes between government troops and its members.
 
Habier Malik, a rebel commander, had refused to let them leave until he received assurances that a meeting about the 1996 deal would take place in Saudi Arabia between the government, the MNLF and the Muslim world's largest grouping, the Organisation of the Islamic Conference (OIC).
 
Fatal encounter
 
Malik also wanted the general to apologise for the killing of nine MNLF members and civilians in an encounter with marines last month.
 
Three soldiers were also killed in the clash on the island of Jolo.
 
The MNLF has said that the military wrongly identified the dead as members of Abu Sayyaf, a group of militant Islamist separatists who broke away from the MNLF, which Manila has vowed to crush.
 
In a ceremony filmed by local television, Malik handed over four assault rifles seized by the MNLF in the fatal encounter.
 
"We just co-operated with them. No cash paid, only sacks of rice and some sardines for the families of the victims of [the] January 18 encounter," Dolorfino said.
Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.