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Asia-Pacific
Manila: Blasts no threat to summit
Philippine police step up security measures for Asian leaders' meeting.
Last Modified: 28 Oct 2007 09:30 GMT
The blasts killed seven and injured dozens
in the southern region of Mindanao [AFP]

The Philippines has said there is no threat to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations summit and a wider meeting of Asian leaders in Cebu this weekend despite the multiple bombings on Wednesday that killed eight people.
 
Nonetheless, police have beefed up security measures on the resort island hundreds of kilometres away from the attacks.
Philippine authorities said the blasts which killed seven and injured dozens in the southern region of Mindanao were meant to embarrass the government.
 
They also said that two groups were suspected to be behind at least one of the bombings, for which no one has claimed responsibility.
Marciano Paynor, director-general of the Asean organising committee, said on Thursday; "It is precisely this act and other acts of senseless violence and terrorism that the leaders will be addressing when they meet here in Cebu."
 
The first and deadliest blast killed six people in General Santos city and wounded 33, police said.
 
The second explosion injured two more in Kidapawan City while the third, from an 81mm mortar, rocked Cotabato city, killing one person and wounding five.
 
Oscar Calderon, the Philippine police chief, said the terror groups "were trying to send a message".
 
"They wanted to embarrass the government because of the meetings in Cebu."
 
Police said two groups, Abu Sayyaf and Jemaah Islamiyah, may have had a hand in one of the incidents.
 
Chief Superintendent German Doria, the regional police director, said the mortar shells used in the Cotabato blast were the signature of the two groups.
 
Both groups have been involved in previous bombings in the Philippines.
Source:
Agencies
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