[QODLink]
Asia-Pacific
Thais keep north under martial law
Military government to lift emergency law in Bangkok and 40 provinces.
Last Modified: 28 Nov 2006 11:48 GMT


Several military personnel have been
appointed to top commercial posts

Under international pressure after its bloodless September coup, Thailand's military government has agreed to lift martial law in Bangkok and 40 other provinces.
 
But martial law would remain in Thailand's 35 other provinces, mostly along the north and northwestern borders, "for security reasons", Boonrawd Somtas, the defence minister, said.
Support for Thaksin Shinawatra, the former prime minister, is strong in the north.
 
The emergency, in effect since Thaksin was toppled, will not be lifted officially until King Bhumibol Adulyadej gives his formal endorsement, which could take several days.
The government, calling itself the Council for National Security (CNS), has often referred to "undercurrents" in the predominantly rural and impoverished north, as justification for its continuation of martial law.
 
However, it has not produced strong evidence of potential uprisings in favour of Thaksin.
 
The Thai public has become increasingly sceptical of the CNC's promises to restore democracy and weed out corruption.
 
Several military personnel have been appointed to top commercial posts and the CNC has instructed the information ministry to "filter" the internet.
 
On the second day of the coup the interim government promised to restore democracy within a year and make fighting corruption a top priority.
Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Western fighters have streamed into the Middle East to help 'liberate' Arab countries such as Syria and Libya.
The Pakistani government is proposing reform of the nation's madrassas, which are accused of fostering terrorism.
Weaving and handicrafts are being re-taught to a younger generation of Iraqi Kurds, but not without challenges.
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Featured
After years of rapid growth, Argentina is bracing for another economic crisis as inflation eats up purchasing power.
Deaths of 13 Sherpas in Nepal has shone a light on dangerous working conditions in the Everest-climbing industry.
Al Jazeera investigation uncovers allegations of beatings and rape in Kenya's ongoing anti-terrorism operation.
Incumbent Joyce Banda has a narrow lead, but anything is possible in Malawi's May 20 elections.
Western fighters have streamed into the Middle East to help 'liberate' Arab countries such as Syria and Libya.
join our mailing list