Arizona group urges veto of gay bill

Already approved bill allows business owners with strongly held religious beliefs to refuse service to gays.

    Arizona group urges veto of gay bill
    Republican Eddie Farnsworth speaks in support of a bill allowing people to refuse service to gays [AP]

    Arizona's biggest business advocacy group has called on the state's governor to veto a bill that allows business owners with strongly held religious beliefs to refuse service to gays.

    The legislation passed last week has triggered a national backlash from supporters of gay rights, and the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry is among business groups now requesting a veto.

    Three Republican state senators who voted for the bill are now urging Governor Jan Brewer to veto it. Senator Bob Worsley says he and senators Adam Driggs and Steve Pierce sent a letter to Brewer on Monday asking her to strike down the legislation. Worsley says he was uncomfortable when he voted for the bill.

    Both he and Pierce called their votes a mistake.

    The business chamber said the bill could hurt tourism, make it hard to recruit new businesses and open the door to lawsuits against businesses.

    But conservative groups supporting the legislation are hoping Brewer signs it in to law.

    The state senate is expected to formally send the already approved bill to Brewer as early as Monday afternoon. She would then have five days to act.

     

    SOURCE: Associated Press


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Almost 300 people died in Mogadishu but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Japan's third-largest steelmaker has admitted it faked data on parts used in cars, planes and trains.