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Obama urges Guantanamo closure this year

In State of the Union address, US president says 2014 should be the year to finally close the US prison.

Last updated: 29 Jan 2014 04:21
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President Barack Obama told Americans that 2014 should be the year to finally close the US prison at Guantanamo Bay as the United States winds down its military role in Afghanistan and shifts away from a "permanent war footing".

In his annual State of the Union address on Wednesday, Obama renewed his old vow - dating back to the start of his presidency five years ago - to shut the internationally condemned jail at the US Naval Base in Cuba, and he called on Congress for further action to help him do so.

"This needs to be the year Congress lifts the remaining restrictions on detainee transfers and we close the prison at Guantanamo Bay," Obama said.

"Because we counter terrorism not just through intelligence and military action, but by remaining true to our constitutional ideals and setting an example for the rest of the world."

Obama stopped short of offering any new prescriptions on how he intends to empty Guantanamo of its remaining 155 prisoners.

They were rounded up overseas after the September 11, 2001, attacks and have been held without trial ever since.

Detainee transfers

But after US politicians made it easier late last year to transfer Guantanamo inmates to their home countries, Obama is in a better position than before to gradually reduce the detainee population.

But he said Congress needed to give him further flexibility.

The effort to close Guantanamo is a critical part of Obama's broader drive to roll back some of the most controversial aspects of the global fight against armed groups as he presses ahead with plans to formally end the long, unpopular war in Afghanistan by the end of the year.

Obama has already sought to narrow the scope of the deadly US drone campaign against al-Qaeda and its allies, and recently announced reforms in surveillance activities triggered by former spy agency contractor Edward Snowden's revelations.

"Even as we aggressively pursue terrorist networks - through more targeted efforts and by building the capacity of our foreign partners - America must move off a permanent war footing," Obama said.

Getting past Bush’s 'war on terror'

Opened by President George W. Bush in 2002, Guantanamo became a symbol of the excesses of his administration's "war on terror" interrogation and detention practices.

This needs to be the year Congress lifts the remaining restrictions on detainee transfers and we close the prison at Guantanamo Bay.

Barack Obama , US President

Obama failed to meet his promise to close the prison within a year of taking office in early 2009, and although he has since recommitted to his pledge, he was reluctant until now to set a new time frame for achieving it.

His renewed promise followed congressional passage in December of a broader defence spending bill that loosened some restrictions on Obama's ability to send more of the Guantanamo detainees home.

Despite that, he still faces major obstacles to shutting Guantanamo. Lawmakers refused to budge on a ban on bringing Guantanamo prisoners to the US mainland.

On top of that, complications remain with Yemen, where US officials fear released prisoners might join up with an active al-Qaeda branch. Yemen's government also has yet to build a long-promised detention centre for any prisoners sent home.

Obama used his speech to reassure a war-weary American public that the US military was on track to withdraw from Afghanistan after more than a decade of war there.

"We will complete our mission there by the end of this year, and America's longest war will finally be over," he said.

He also sent a thinly veiled message to Afghan President Hamid Karzai, who is locked in a test of wills with Washington over efforts to reach a long-term security pact that would enable a small contingent of US forces to remain in the country beyond 2014.

The White House has warned that it will resort to a "zero option," pulling out all US forces at the end of the year unless he signs a security deal soon.

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Source:
Reuters
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