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Brazil protesters disrupt Rio military parade

At least 10 people arrested as protests against corruption and poor public services take place across country.

Last Modified: 08 Sep 2013 05:56
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Protesters in Rio de Janeiro have interrupted a military parade to mark Brazil's Independence Day, prompting a clash with police that injured at least five people, authorities say.

Police used tear gas and rubber bullets to scatter the dozens of protesters, arresting at least 10 of them.

Five people were injured and taken to hospital, civil police said of the clashes on Saturday.

The protesters, some masked, entered the downtown avenue where the military was parading, shouting slogans and the clash with police followed. The firing of tear gas prompted spectators, many of them families with children, to flee the area.

Police chased several protesters who escaped through side streets, shooting rubber bullets, according to local news site G1. At least one bank branch near the demonstration was vandalised, it added.

The protest at the Rio parade was one of more than 100 planned anti-government protests across Brazil on Saturday.

In the capital Brasilia, about 1,000 protesters gathered peacefully in front of the Congress building.

Saturday's protests were widespread, but not nearly as large as massive demonstrations that sprang up in June.

Brazilians are protesting against corruption and poor public services despite a heavy tax burden.

"We want better education, political reforms and media democratisation. The June protests served to push Congress to approve measures - we have to keep them alive," a student demonstrator, Philip Leite, told the AFP news agency.

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Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
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