[QODLink]
Americas

US judge rules not to drop Manning charge

Military judge denies defence request to drop charges of aiding the enemy against US Army private Bradley Manning.

Last Modified: 19 Jul 2013 05:50
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

A military judge has refused to dismiss the most serious charge against the Army private who gave reams of classified information to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks.

The charge of aiding the enemy faced by Pfc Bradley Manning is punishable by up to life in prison without parole.

Colonel Denise Lind, the judge in Manning's court-martial, on Thursday denied defence requests to drop that charge and a computer fraud charge, ruling that the government had presented some evidence to support each element of the charges.

Lind is still considering defence motions to acquit Manning of five theft counts.

To convict Manning, the government must prove the charges beyond a reasonable doubt; however, they had to meet a less stringent standard in convincing Lind that the charges should stand.

Manning has pleaded guilty to reduced versions of some charges. He faces up to 20 years in prison for those offenses.

The 25-year-old has acknowledged giving the anti-secrecy group hundreds of thousands of Iraq and Afghanistan battlefield reports and State Department diplomatic cables, along with battlefield videos and other documents.

He downloaded them in late 2009 and early 2010 from a classified government computer network while working as an intelligence analyst in Iraq.

WikiLeaks posted much of the material on its website.

195

Source:
Agencies
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
The Pakistani government is proposing reform of the nation's madrassas, which are accused of fostering terrorism.
Weaving and handicrafts are being re-taught to a younger generation of Iraqi Kurds, but not without challenges.
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Featured
Critics say unregulated spending on India's elections is subverting the vote.
Libya has seen a blossoming of media outlets, but the media landscape is as polarised as the politics on the streets.
As nuclear age approaches eighth decade, visitors flock to historic bomb craters at New Mexico test sites.
Venezuela's president lacks the charisma and cult of personality maintained by the late Hugo Chavez.
Despite the Geneva deal, anti-government protesters in Ukraine's eastern regions don't intend to leave any time soon.
join our mailing list