Envoy murder plotter gets 25 years in jail

Manssor Arbabsiar is one of two men charged in a murder-for-hire plot against the Saudi ambassador to the US.

    Envoy murder plotter gets 25 years in jail
    The US Attorney General said that Arbabsiar's plot was "conceived, sponsored and directed from Iran" [AFP]

    An Iranian-born used car salesman from Texas has been sentenced to 25 years in a US prison after pleading guilty to participating in a plot with an Iranian military unit to murder the Saudi Arabian ambassador to the United States.

    Manssor Arbabsiar, 58, received the sentence at a hearing before US District Judge John Keenan in Manhattan on Thursday.

    He had pleaded guilty in October last year to charges related to his seeking to hire Mexican drug traffickers to kill the ambassador.

    The plot was vehemently denied by Tehran.

    He pleaded guilty to one count of murder-for hire, one count of conspiracy to commit murder-for-hire, and one count of conspiracy to commit an act of terrorism transcending national boundaries.

    The supposed member of the international drug trafficking cartel, who Arbabsiar offered to pay $1.5m to carry out the plot, was in reality a confidential informant of the US Drug Enforcement Administration.

    No weapons were obtained and the scheme to kill Saudi Ambassador Adel al-Jubeir was not fulfilled.

    "I can't change what I did," Arbabsiar said in a brief statement in court.

    US authorities also brought charges against Gholam Shakuri, who prosecutors say was a member of the Quds Force, the covert unit of Iran's Revolutionary Guards.

    Shakuri, whom Arbabsiar called after being arrested. has not himself been arrested.

    Lawyers for Arbabsiar had sought a lower sentence of 10 years, contending he had provided assistance to US authorities after his arrest and citing purported mental health issues.

    In addition to his prison sentence, Arbabsiar was ordered to forfeit $125,000.

    'A nefarious plot'

    In a statement, the Saudi embassy in Washington said the sentencing was "another step along the road to justice and sends a message of determination against those who seek to disrupt order in the international community through flagrant violations of international laws, human values and ethics."

    Manhattan US Attorney Preet Bharara in a statement called Arbabsiar "an enemy among us" and a "key conduit for, and facilitator of, a nefarious international plot" to kill the ambassador and as many innocent bystanders as needed to finish the job.

    According to prosecutors, the plot had its origins in a spring 2011 trip by Arbabsiar to Iran to visit his family.

    A cousin who was a high-ranking member of the Quds Force told Arbabsiar he wanted him to find someone he could hire to kidnap al-Jubeir, prosecutors said in the May 2 filing.

    The cousin subsequently put Arbabsiar in touch with Shakuri, his deputy, who would be in charge of the mission, the filing said.

    After returning to Texas, Arbabsiar in May 2011 went to Mexico and met with the DEA source, who Arbabsiar met through someone he knew in Texas.

    As part of the deal with the DEA source, Arbabsiar wired $100,000 as a down-payment for the $1.5 million offered to carry out the plot, which by then had evolved to murdering the ambassador, prosecutors said.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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