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Venezuela's Capriles to run for president

Opposition leader says he will challenge late Hugo Chavez's preferred successor for the presidency in next month's poll.
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2013 09:57

Opposition leader Henrique Capriles has entered the race to succeed Hugo Chavez in the April 14 election, accusing the late Venezuelan leader's chosen successor of using Chavez's death for political ends.

Capriles, who lost to Chavez in the October election, launched a broadside against acting President Nicolas Maduro on Sunday, even suggesting that he lied about the day that Chavez died.

"Nicolas, I won't leave you an open path, mate. You are going to have to defeat me with votes," the telegenic 40-year-old Miranda state governor said in a news conference.

After weeks of rumors about the president's health, Maduro went on national television last Tuesday to announce the death of Chavez, telling that nation that the firebrand leftist had lost his two-year battle with cancer at that age of 58.

"Nicolas lied to this country," Capriles said, adding that the former vice president had been buying time during Chavez's illness to prepare the election.

"Who knows when president Chavez died?"

Al Jazeera's Gabriele Elizondo, reporting from Caracas, said there were several challenges facing Capriles ahead of the poll.

"The elections are coming up very soon. There are only 10 days of official campaigning before the election. He's got a very small window of time to convince people," Elizondo said.

'Sickened by power'

Chavez traveled to Cuba on December 10 for a fourth round of cancer surgery and was never heard or seen in public again. He returned to Caracas on February 18 and no images of him were ever shown until his death.

He has been lying in state since Wednesday in an open casket at a Caracas military academy.

 

The government says it will embalm the body for posterity to be viewed "like Lenin" in a glass casket, a decision denounced by the opposition, which says Chavez wanted to be buried.

"Now on top of it all, you are using the body of the president to stage a political campaign," Capriles said, accusing the late leader's aides of being "sickened by power".

The opposition leader accused the government again of abusing its power and violating the constitution by swearing-in Maduro as acting president late Friday, arguing that he should have stepped down in order to run for office.

Maduro has countered that the opposition conveniently misinterpreted the constitution and that his inauguration followed the wishes of his predecessor, who had asked the nation to elect him if he died.

Hours before Capriles spoke, Maduro accepted the backing of the communist party, with words of praise for Chavez and disdain for the "reactionary, troglodyte right-wing".

'Man of the street'

"I am a man of the street. I am not in this post of acting president and I won't be president from April 15 because of vanity or personal aspirations," the burly, 50-year-old former bus driver and union activist told a communist party conference.

"I will be president and commander-in-chief of the armed forces because that was the order that he (Chavez) gave me and I will fulfill his orders," Maduro said.

The two candidates will register for the snap election on Monday.

The late president will cast a huge shadow over the election, with throngs of Chavez loyalists continuing to file past his open casket at the military academy under a baking sun.

As they stood in line, they chanted: "Chavez I swear to you, my vote is for Maduro!"

"This will be a very complex election, with a very short campaign in which the government has a clear advantage emotionally with the recent death of Chavez," said Luis Vicente Leon, director of pollsters Datanalisis.

"It will be a battle between the divine and the human," he said.

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Source:
Al Jazeera And Agencies
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