[QODLink]
Americas

Colombian rebels release Chinese captives

FARC frees four oil workers taken hostage last year in another goodwill gesture during peace talks with government.
Last Modified: 23 Nov 2012 12:01
The detainees were released with the help of the international Red Cross and the Chinese government [AFP]

The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) have freed three captive Chinese oil workers and their translator after detaining them in jungle camps for more than a year, the Colombian defence ministry has said. 

The release of the hostages on Wednesday was apparently a goodwill gesture as the rebels seek to negotiate a peace accord with the government to end five decades of war.

The captives, who worked for a contractor hired by UK-based Emerald Energy, were taken hostage by the FARC, in mid-2011 as they were driving in southern Colombia, the government said.

The detainees were freed as a result of a collaboration between the Red Cross and the Chinese government, Colombian Vice Defence Minister Jorge Enrique Bedoya told reporters. 

The move by FARC came after the rebel group called a unilateral ceasefire for two months at the start of peace talks in Cuba on Monday.  

"The government provided all the help possible so that this (liberation) could develop without any problems. We are very
happy that these Chinese citizens can return to their homes," Bedoya said.

A decade-long government offensive against the FARC has pushed the rebels deep into inhospitable jungle territory, helping foreign and local oil companies explore territory that was once off-limits.

But the fighters have stepped up attacks against oil installations over the last year or so, bombing pipelines, kidnapping workers, and making it difficult for companies to maintain output levels.

FARC 'hypocrisy'

The FARC pledged in February that it would no longer take hostages for ransom, one of the group's main sources of income along with drug trafficking and extortion, according to police sources.

After the FARC this year released a group of military and police officials it had held for more than a decade, rebel leaders repeatedly said the group was not holding any more captives.

FARC negotiators in Cuba reiterated that they hold no hostages.

"This again demonstrates the double standard and hypocrisy of the FARC, which announced that it held no more captives," Bedoya said.

Jordi Raich, head of the Colombian delegation of the International Committee of the Red Cross, said he could not confirm the government's claim that the FARC was responsible for the kidnapping. He said it was not in his ambit to investigate.

"We received (the hostages) from a group of people dressed in civilian clothes and without weapons," he told reporters.

"It's excellent news for the families after so much time of waiting and uncertainty."

374

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Featured
Anti-government secrecy organisation struggling for relevance without Julian Assange at the helm.
After decades of overfishing, Japan is taking aim at increasing the number of bluefin tuna in the ocean.
Chinese scientists are designing a particle-smashing collider so massive it could encircle a city.
Critics say the government is going full-steam ahead on economic recovery at the expense of human rights.
Spirits are high in Scotland's 'Whisky Capital of the World' with one distillery thirsty for independence.
join our mailing list