[QODLink]
Americas
Conviction of Bin Laden driver overturned
Court overturns 2008 ruling saying Salim Ahmed Hamdan was tried for crimes from 1996 - 2001 using a 2006 law.
Last Modified: 17 Oct 2012 04:02

A US court of appeals has overturned a conviction of Salim Ahmed Hamdan, a former driver for Osama Bin Laden.

Tuesday's reversal would see Hamdan's 2008 conviction of supporter terrorism being thrown out because he was tried under a law that did not apply to his the allegations against him.

“Because we read the Military Commissions Act not to retroactively punish new crimes, and because material support for terrorism was not a pre-existing war crime under 10 U.S.C. § 821, Hamdan’s conviction for material support for terrorism cannot stand,” the District of Columbia appellate court ruled.

The court noted that Hamdan’s crime occurred from 1996 to 2001.

The 2006 Military Commissions  Act, which specifically lists material support for terrorism as a war crime triable by military commission, cannot be applied retroactively to cover Hamdan's five-year stint as a driver for the al-Qaeda leader.

Hamdan was sentenced to five-and-a-half years by a panel of six US military officers in 2008.

The ruling found that his role as driver to the al-Qaeda leader qualified as material support for terrorism.

He was released early into his sentence because he had already spent six years in custody at the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base detention camp in Cuba.

Hamdan was the first detainee in the detention camp to be convicted of war crimes. He was captured in Afghanistan two months after the September 11 attacks.

230

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Western fighters have streamed into the Middle East to help 'liberate' Arab countries such as Syria and Libya.
The Pakistani government is proposing reform of the nation's madrassas, which are accused of fostering terrorism.
Weaving and handicrafts are being re-taught to a younger generation of Iraqi Kurds, but not without challenges.
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Featured
After years of rapid growth, Argentina is bracing for another economic crisis as inflation eats up purchasing power.
Deaths of 13 Sherpas in Nepal has shone a light on dangerous working conditions in the Everest-climbing industry.
Al Jazeera investigation uncovers allegations of beatings and rape in Kenya's ongoing anti-terrorism operation.
Incumbent Joyce Banda has a narrow lead, but anything is possible in Malawi's May 20 elections.
Western fighters have streamed into the Middle East to help 'liberate' Arab countries such as Syria and Libya.
join our mailing list