[QODLink]
Americas
Lebanon film voted best by Toronto audience
Bittersweet comedy wins fans' award at festival, normally considered a bellwether for Oscar success.
Last Modified: 19 Sep 2011 02:35
Nadine Labaki's bittersweet comedy follows the antics of a town's women to stop men from starting a religious war 

"Where Do We Go Now?" a bittersweet comedy set in war-torn Lebanon, bested two well-received entries starring George Clooney to win the people's choice award on Sunday at the Toronto International Film Festival.

The award, which also includes a $15,000 cash prize, is voted on by festival audiences and has typically been regarded as a bellwether for Oscar success.

Lebanese-Canadian director-actress Nadine Labaki's feminist film about village women bent on keeping their hot-headed men out of a religious war was chosen earlier this month as Lebanon's 2011 entry in the best foreign language film category for the Academy Awards.

Festival director Piers Handling noted it was a surprise triumph for a film that was overshadowed by heavily promoted, star-studded Hollywood films. These included Clooney's two films, "The Descendants" and "The Ides of March."

"We have some very, very high-profile films here at the festival and ones that a lot of people are talking about and I'm sure will go on to awards," said Handling.

"But Nadine's film obviously connected with the public in a significant way because it was a clear, clear winner."

Oscar glory?

Last year's fans' pick, "The King's Speech," went on to take four Oscars, including best picture, and the 2008 people's choice winner, "Slumdog Millionaire," took best picture and seven other Oscars.

Quebec director Philippe Falardeau's "Monsieur Lazhar," about an Algerian schoolteacher in Quebec and his relationship with two students, won the award for best Canadian feature and a $30,000 prize.

The best first Canadian feature award, which includes a $15,000 prize, went to director Nathan Morlando's period piece "Edwin Boyd," starring Scott Speedman as the notorious Canadian bank robber.

"Where Do We Go Now?" garnered rave reviews at this year's Cannes Film Festival, where it screened on the margins of the official competition.

It follows Labaki's feature "Caramel," a sweet love story set in a Beirut beauty salon, which was Lebanon's entry for the 2007 best foreign language film Oscar.

Set in a remote village where the church and the mosque stand side by side, "Where Do We Go Now?" follows the antics of the town's women to keep their blowhard men from starting a religious war. Heartsick over sons, husbands and fathers lost to previous flare-ups, the women unite to distract their men with clever ruses, from faking a miracle to hiring a troop of Ukrainian strippers.

Labaki wrote the screenplay for the film which was shot on location in three remote Lebanese villages with a cast made up almost entirely of non-professional actors. Married to the film's composer, Khaled Mouzannar, she also included a handful of old-school song-and-dance numbers that buoy the mood.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.