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Haiti's dilapidated hospitals
Expectant mothers are worried over inadequate health services six months after deadly quake.
Last Modified: 13 Jul 2010 19:15 GMT

Like everything else, Haiti's medical infrastructure was dealt a severe blow by the deadly earthquake that struck the country six months ago, killing at least 200,000 people.

Six months on, the central public hospital remains in disrepair.

While the devastating quake has inspired an unprecedented outpouring of generosity from countries around the world, recovery efforts are still slow in the aftermath of the disaster.

IN DEPTH

  Haiti capital still in ruins

At least 1.5 million people are still living in temporary shelters, which are in danger of blowing away during hurricane season. The country does not have a resettlement strategy and most families have not been able to move into a new home.

Meanwhile, crime rates are soaring due to gangs of thugs roaming Haiti's streets, 98 per cent of which are stiill covered in rubble.

With few services offering little protection to the most vulnerable groups, pregnant mothers are concerned about Haiti's dilapidated hospitals that are in need of repair.

Al Jazeera's Lucia Newman reports.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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