[QODLink]
Americas
Profile: Helen Thomas
Tough questioner was a White House correspondent for six decades.
Last Modified: 08 Jun 2010 09:40 GMT
Thomas, centre, was considered the dean of White House correspondents (REUTERS) 

Born in the US city of Detroit in 1920, Helen Thomas is regarded as a pioneer for women in journalism. 

Thomas, a tough interrogator, worked for the United Press Internatoinal news agency from 1943 before moving to Hearst Newspapers in 2000 as a columnist.

She covered many beats typically concerning the federal government in her early years with United Press Internatoinal, before joining the agency's White House team after John F Kennedy was elected to office in the 1960s, becoming a White House correspondent.

She travelled many times with presidents, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton, on foreign trips. In 1972 she accompanied Nixon on his historic visit to communist China during the Cold War.

Thomas repeatedly grilled George Bush and his administration over the 2003 Iraq war and subsequent occupation.

She was the first female office bearer and then president of the White House Correspondents' Association.

Considered the dean of White House correspondents, Thomas had a seat reserved for her in the building's press briefing room, on the front row.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Featured
Pro-Russia leaders' election in Ukraine's east shows bloody conflict is far from a peaceful resolution.
Critics challenge Canberra's move to refuse visas for West Africans in Ebola-besieged countries.
A key issue for Hispanics is the estimated 11.3 million immigrants in the US without papers who face deportation.
In 1970, only two mosques existed in the country, but now more than 200 offer sanctuary to Japan's Muslims.
Hundreds of the country's reporters eke out a living by finding news - then burying it for a price.