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November polls for Haiti
President orders polls to be organised but residents feel it will not help their lives.
Last Modified: 28 Jun 2010 03:22 GMT
Preval has been under pressure to announce a date to elect his successor [EPA]

Haiti's president has ordered that presidential and legislative elections be held on November 28.

Rene Preval issued decrees over the weekend ordering the country's nine-member provisional electoral council to organise the elections but did not address opponents' calls for the council itself to be replaced before a vote is held.

Preval's five-year presidential term ends on February 7, but parliament has voted to allow him to remain in office until May 14 should a successor not be chosen by February.

The international community had been pressing Preval to announce an election date to maintain stability as the country struggles to rebuild from a devastating earthquake that struck in January.

Disinterest

But Al Jazeera's Sebastian Walker, reporting from the capital Port-au-Prince, said that on the street, there has been significant opposition to holding an election in conditions where over a million people have been displaced by the quake.

"Many say holding an election now simply isn't feasible and when you speak to people who are living in the camps, they say that a change in leadership isn't really an answer that will lead to an improvement in their situation," he said.

"There is also a sentiment of disinterest and many say it will have very little impact on their lives."

Low turnout and accusations of fraud marred Haiti's last elections in 2009 and the new elections are expected to cost $44m, most of which likely from the international community.

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
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