Cuban police break up protest march

Female relatives of dissidents heckled during march outside Havana, then removed in buses.

    The wives and mothers of political prisoners marched to demand that they be freed [AFP]

    The government said the hecklers acted spontaneously as a result of disgust with the women, but some believe the government organises them and that many of those taking part are members of state security.

    The AFP news agency reported that police arrested the 30 women.

    "We are protesting peacefully and we are not going to get on the bus of a government that has kept our family members in prison for seven years," Laura Pollan, the leader of the group, said before being forced onto a bus.

    Reyna Luisa Tamayo, Zapata's mother, said that her son had been tortured in prison and that his death on the 85th day of a hunger strike amounted to "premeditated murder".

    Government crackdown

    The Ladies in White have staged marches every day this week to mark the anniversary of a 2003 government crackdown that resulted in 75 opposition activities being jailed, 53 of whom remain behind bars.

    Cuba's human rights situation has been a cause of renewed international tension since Zapata's death.

    Another man, Guillermo Farinas, has refused to eat or drink since shortly after Zapata's death, though he is allowing himself to be fed intravenously periodically at a local hospital.

    The European parliament last week voted overwhelmingly to condemn Cuba for
    Zapata's death, and a group of artists and intellectuals have begun to circulate a petition criticising the Cuban government's actions.

    And on Tuesday, the human rights group Amnesty International called for the
    release of all political prisoners.

    Cuba has rebuffed the criticism, saying it will not give in to pressure or blackmail. The government describes the dissidents as common criminals who it believes are paid by the US to destabilise the government, saying every country should have the right to jail traitors.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Revival: The Muslim Response to the Crusades

    Revival: The Muslim Response to the Crusades

    This part of 'The Crusades: An Arab Perspective' explores the birth of the Muslim revival in the face of the Crusades.

    Going undercover as a sex worker

    Going undercover as a sex worker

    A photojournalist describes how she posed as a prostitute to follow the trade in human flesh.

    Africa is not poor, we are stealing its wealth

    Africa is not poor, we are stealing its wealth

    It's time to change the way we talk and think about Africa.