Honduran economy faces challenges

Businesses and workers are mindful of how election's outcome could steer country.

    Election polls are due to open in Honduras, but Manuel Zelaya, Honduras' deposed leader, has repeatedly called for a boycott of the vote on Sunday.

    Zelaya and his supporters say that recognising the ballot will only legitimise the military coup, which many people in Honduras say was backed by the country's economic elite.

    Amid the hearsay, the United States and several other nations have promised to recognise Sunday's winner, which could provide hope for Honduras's economy - both its controlling interests and its workers.

    But many Hondurans are worried about how long will it take to reverse the damage already done.

    Al Jazeera's Craig Mauro reports.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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