He would not comment further on what he discussed with Zelaya.

Stalled negotiations

Honduras has been in crisis since a coup in June - the first in Central America for more than a decade - ousted Zelaya as he pushed forward plans to hold a public-consultation on whether to change the constitution.

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The military expelled him from power by force and he spent almost three months in exile in Nicaragua, before returning to Honduras where he has used the Brazilian embassy as a base.

Since his return, Zelaya's representatives have held talks with the Micheletti camp  without any success.

Zelaya's team said that they would not return to the debating table until the coup-installed government provided more "constructive proposals".

They accused Micheletti's government of attempting to obstruct talks by insisting that Congress and the Supreme Court be consulted on Zelaya's potential return.

Congress installed Micheletti as president after the coup and the Supreme Court has already said that Zelaya should not be allowed to re-take power.

"The dialogue has been obstructed," Zelaya said.

'Delaying tactics'

Zelaya's team has said that Micheletti is attempting to stay in power until the elections planned for November 29.

Vilma Morales, a spokeswoman for the de-facto government, has requested Zelaya's team to resume talks.

"We have to sit down at the table to come up with different alternatives and options,'' Morales said.

The political crisis has compounded economic woes in the nation of some 7.6 million people.