[QODLink]
Americas
FBI rejects Taliban US attack claim
Fourteen people die after gunman goes on shooting spree at immigrant centre.
Last Modified: 04 Apr 2009 16:32 GMT

Police surrounded the building after
the gunman took hostages [AFP]

The US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has dismissed claims made by the Pakistan Taliban that it was responsible for an attack in the state of New York in which a gunman killed 13 people.

Baitullah Mehsud, the leader of the Pakistani Taliban, had claimed in a phone call to Al Jazeera that he had ordered the shooting in which a man, believed to be a Vietnamese immigrant, opened fire at an immigration centre.

Mehsud had said the attack was a direct response to the drone attacks carried out by US forces on Pakistani tribal areas and a second attacker had managed to escape.

But Richard Kolko, an FBI spokesman, said on Saturday: "Based on the evidence, we can firmly discount that claim."

At least 13 people died after the assailant went on a shooting spree at the centre where aid is given to immigrants, before he shot himself dead.

Al Jazeera reporter Kristen Saloomey said the gunman is believed to have been a 42-year-old immigrant who had recently lost his job and was distressed after being teased and humiliated over his poor English language skills.

Heavily armed police, backed by commandos and FBI agents, surrounded the American Civic Association building in Binghampton, northern New York, on Friday after the incident was first reported.

Hostage reports

The man had entered the building in Binghamton, about 240 km northwest of New York city, and shot two receptionists, Joseph Zikuski, the Binghampton police chief, said.

Police say the attack was premeditated [Reuters] 

"It obviously was premeditated,'' said Zikuski.

He said the gunman had blocked the centre's rear exit with his car.

"He made sure nobody could escape,' he said.

One receptionist was killed, but another pretended to be dead, then crawled to a desk and called authorities, he said.

Zhanar Tokhtabayeva, from Kazakhstan, said she was in an English class when she heard a shot and her teacher screamed for everyone to hide in a storage room.

"I heard the shots, every shot. I heard no screams, just silence, shooting,'' she said. 

"I was thinking, when will this stop? I was thinking that my life was finished.''

The American Civic Association helps immigrants in the Binghamton area with citizenship applications, according to US Citizenship and Immigration Services.

Shooting incidents have become increasingly common in the US, where guns are widely available and the rights to own them are fiercely debated.

In 2007, in one of the worst incidents, a student went on a gun rampage, killing 32 people at Virginia Tech University in Blacksburg, Virginia.

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Mehdi Hasan discusses online freedoms and the potential of the web with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.
A tight race seems likely as 814 million voters elect leaders in world's largest democracy next week.
Featured
Since independence, Zimbabwe has faced food shortages, hyperinflation - and several political crises.
After a sit-in protest at Poland's parliament, lawmakers are set to raise government aid to carers of disabled youth.
A vocal minority in Ukraine's east wants to join Russia, and Kiev has so far been unable to put down the separatists.
Iran's government has shifted its take on 'brain drain' but is the change enough to reverse the flow?
Deadly attacks on anti-mining activists in the Philippines part of a global trend, according to new report.
join our mailing list