[QODLink]
Americas
Boycott hits UN racism conference
Several western nations join US in protest against "unfair criticism of Israel".
Last Modified: 20 Apr 2009 02:43 GMT
Israeli and Jewish groups lobbied for the US administration to boycott [File: Gallo/Getty]

The United States has said it will not attend an United Nations conference on racism because the text of the draft final statement contains language it is "unable to support", the state department has said.

Negotiators had been trying to find common ground before the meeting in Geneva, but the US said there were still concerns it would limit free speech and single out Israel for criticism.

"Unfortunately, it now seems certain these remaining concerns will not be addressed in the document to be adopted by the conference next week," Robert Wood, US state department spokesman, said in a statement issued late on Saturday.

"Therefore, with regret, the United States will not join the review conference.''

Washington's decision followed intense lobbying by Israeli and Jewish groups.

In depth


 Geneva searches for the right words

The American Israel Public Affairs Committee said the decision "underscores America's unstinting commitment to combatting intolerance and racism in all its forms and in all settings".

The United States and Israel walked out of the World Conference on Racism in Durban, South Africa in 2001, after a row with some Muslim states about Israel's treatment of the Palestinians and anti-Semitism.

The five-day Geneva conference, which begins on Monday, has been called to assess international progress in fighting racism and xenophobia since the Durban meeting.

'Deeply dismayed'

Washington's decision is likely to anger human rights advocates and some in the African-American community who had hoped that Barack Obama, the nation's first black president, would send an official delegation.

"This decision is inconsistent with the administration's policy of engaging with those we agree with and those we disagree with"

Barbara Lee,
chair of the congressional black caucus

Barbara Lee, the Democrat chair of the congressional black caucus, said the group was "deeply dismayed".

"This decision is inconsistent with the administration's policy of engaging with those we agree with and those we disagree with," she said.

"By boycotting Durban, the US is making it more difficult for it to play a leadership role on UN Human Rights Council as it states it plans to do. This is a missed opportunity, plain and simple."

Some revisions had been made to the original text in order to find consensus, including the removal of passages specifically criticising Israel and others dealing with the defamation of religion.

But Wood said that not enough concessions had been made.

"[It] singles out one particular conflict and prejudges key issues that can only be resolved in negotiations between the Israelis and Palestinians," he said.

The US pulled out of planning talks for the Geneva meeting on February 27, complaining that changes must be made.

'Tragic farce'

Israel has criticised a meeting between Hans-Rudolf Merz, the Swiss president, and Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, his Iranian counterpart, to be held before the conference, which it described as a "tragic farce".

"Officially it is aimed at denouncing racism, but it has invited a Holocaust denier who has called for the destruction of Israel," Yossi Levy, an Israeli foreign ministry spokesman, said.

Australia, Canada, Italy and the Netherlands have also chosen not to attend.

"Regrettably, we cannot be confident that the review conference will not again be used as a platform to air offensive views, including anti-Semitic views," Stephen Smith, Australia's foreign minister, said.

The European Union is meeting late on Sunday to determine a common position on whether to send delegations to Geneva.

Britain has already said it would take part in the meeting but without a high-level official.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Mehdi Hasan discusses online freedoms and the potential of the web with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.
A tight race seems likely as 814 million voters elect leaders in world's largest democracy next week.
Featured
Venezuela's president lacks the charisma and cult of personality maintained by the late Hugo Chavez.
Despite the Geneva deal, anti-government protesters in Ukraine's eastern regions don't intend to leave any time soon.
Since independence, Zimbabwe has faced food shortages, hyperinflation - and several political crises.
After a sit-in protest at Poland's parliament, lawmakers are set to raise government aid to carers of disabled youth.
A vocal minority in Ukraine's east wants to join Russia, and Kiev has so far been unable to put down the separatists.
join our mailing list