[QODLink]
Americas
Paraguay leader admits paternity
Fernando Lugo admits liaison while still serving as a Roman Catholic bishop.
Last Modified: 13 Apr 2009 22:34 GMT
Lugo, left, won the Paraguayan
presidency last April [EPA]

Fernando Lugo, Paraguay's president, has admitted that he is the father of a child conceived while he was still a Roman Catholic bishop.

Lugo made the surprise announcement on Monday, days after lawyers for the child's 26-year-old mother reportedly filed a paternity suit.

"I assume all responsibilities having to do with the fact that I had a relationship with [the child's mother] and I recognise paternity," Lugo said on national television.

The mother of the child, who will be two-years-old next month, later denied signing any complaint and said she had not authorised the lawyers to file a suit on her behalf, Reuters reported.

Election win

Lugo resigned as bishop of Paraguay's central San Pedro province in 2004 after administering there for 10 years.

He announced two years later that he was renouncing the status of bishop to run for president.

He won the presidency last April as head of a left-leaning coalition that ended more than 60 years of one-party rule in the poor South American country.

But the Catholic church initially rejected his application for layman's status, changing its mind and relieving him of his vows of chastity only after he won elections last year.

The lawsuit indicated that Lugo and the child's mother met when he was bishop in San Pedro and that he stayed in the house of her godmother.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Featured
Pro-Russia leaders' election in Ukraine's east shows bloody conflict is far from a peaceful resolution.
Critics challenge Canberra's move to refuse visas for West Africans in Ebola-besieged countries.
A key issue for Hispanics is the estimated 11.3 million immigrants in the US without papers who face deportation.
In 1970, only two mosques existed in the country, but now more than 200 offer sanctuary to Japan's Muslims.
Hundreds of the country's reporters eke out a living by finding news - then burying it for a price.