Obama choices withdraw over taxes

US president's health and financial oversight post choices withdraw over tax issues.

    Obama's treasury secretary choice, Geithner, left,
    also faced questions over tax problems 
    [AFP]

    He had earlier said in a statement he accepted Daschle's withdrawal with "sadness and regret" but said the government "must move forward".

    Daschle said he withdrew because he did not want the tax issue to become "distraction" for Obama's healthcare reform plans, as questions were also asked over his ties to the health lobbying industry.

    Taking 'responsibility'

    In depth
    Robert Gibbs, the White House press secretary, said both former nominees "recognised that you can't set an example of responsibility but accept a different standard of who serves".

    Gibbs also said that Obama the president still had "confidence" in the other people he had chosen to serve in government and defended the administration's vetting process.

    However he also said the US president "takes responsibility" for the nomination problems.

    Daschle and Killefer's moves come only weeks after Bill Richardson, the governor of New Mexico, withdrew his name from consideration as commerce secretary after it emerged he was the subject of a probe into a state contract awarded to his political donors.

    And Tim Geithner, Obama's nomination for treasury secretary, had earlier only just survived a controversy over his own unpaid taxes, before eventually being sworn in last week.

    It also comes as Obama is urging the US senate to approve a $900bn economic stimulus bill despite stiff opposition from US Republicans.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    More than 300 people died in Somalia but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Japan's third-largest steelmaker has admitted it faked data on parts used in cars, planes and trains.