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US court allows use of navy sonar
Top court permits naval sonar despite fears of injury to marine animals.
Last Modified: 13 Nov 2008 00:35 GMT
The Bush administration cited national
security for the necessity of the training [AFP]

The US supreme court has ruled the US navy can conduct sonar training exercises off southern California without restrictions, in a blow to environmentalists.

The court on Wednesday threw out a federal judge's injunction requiring the navy to take precautions during submarine-hunting exercises ino order to prevent injury to whales and other marine mammals.

John Roberts, the court's chief justice, said that public interest favoured a well-equipped US navy and that an inadequately trained submarine force "jeopardises the safety of the fleet".

The dispute involved 14 training exercises off the California coast that began in February of last year and are due to end in January.

The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and other environmental groups had successfully sued the navy in federal courts earlier this year on grounds of possible damage and injury to the region's dolphins, whales and sea lions, along with more than 30 other species of marine mammals in the area.

'Narrow' ruling

However, George Bush, the US president, intervened in the dispute by citing the necessity to US national security of the exercises and exempting the Navy from the environmental laws at the heart of the legal challenge.

The navy also argued the area off southern California is the only location on the
west coast that is relatively close to land, air and sea bases as well as amphibious landing areas.

A US appeals court later rejected the Bush administration's attempt to exempt the navy from the laws, prompting the administration to appeal to the Supreme Court and argue that the judges should have deferred to the judgment of the navy and Bush.

The ruling did not deal directly with the issue of environmental damage and Joel Reynolds, the director of the NRDC's marine mammal protection programme, said the ruling was "narrow" and did not establish "a bright-line rule".

"The court acknowledged that environmental interests are important, but in this case that the interest in training was greater ... than interest in the
environment," he told AP.

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
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