[QODLink]
Americas
Photos show rare Amazon tribe
Striking images show uncontacted Amazon tribe in Brazilian state of Acre.
Last Modified: 05 Jun 2008 16:01 GMT

The group's numbers are increasing but they are in severe danger from illegal logging in Peru [Reuters]

Amazon-Indians from one of the world's last uncontacted tribes have been photographed from the air, with striking images showing them painted bright red and brandishing bows and arrows.
 
The photographs, released on Thursday, were taken in the Brazilian state of Acre, near the Peruvian border, and are rare evidence that such tribes still exist.
Jose Carlos Meirelles, an official who works for the Brazilian government's Indian affairs department was involved in the expedition.
 
He says the group's numbers are increasing but they are in severe danger from illegal logging in Peru.
Jose Carlos Meirelles, an official from the Brazilian government's Indian affairs department, says the group's numbers are increasing but they are in severe danger from illegal logging in Peru.
 
In danger
 
"What is happening in this region is a monumental crime against the natural world, the tribes, the fauna and is further testimony to the complete irrationality with which we, the 'civilized' ones, treat the world," Meirelles stated in a statement issued by the Survival International group, which supports tribal peoples around the world.
 
In video


Uncontacted tribe filmed on Brazil-Peru border

One of the pictures shows two tribesmen covered in bright red pigment poised to fire arrows at the expedition's aircraft while another tribesman looks on.
 
Another photo shows about 15 Indians near thatched huts, some of them also preparing to fire arrows at the aircraft.
 
Stephen Corry, the director of Survival International, said, "The world needs to wake up to this, and ensure that their territory is protected in accordance with international law."
 
"Otherwise, they will soon be made extinct," he said.
 
There are more than 100 uncontacted tribes worldwide. More than half live in either Brazil or Peru, Survival International says.
 
It says all are in grave danger of being forced off their land, killed and ravaged by new diseases.
Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.