Argentine farmers resume protest

Talks with government over export-tax increase breaks down after just five hours.

    The farmers' protests have  paralysed
    exports from Argentina [AFP]

    Protest to stay
     
    "Since farmers and livestock producers have not had an answer to their complaints ... we have decided to continue with protest measures," the country's four big agro-industrial groups said in a joint statement.
     
    They said they would talk with the government on Monday but that the protest would remain in place at least until Wednesday.
     
    Argentina's economic woes


    Although rich in natural resources, Argentina's 39.5 million population has suffered in several economic crises in recent decades

    Fiscal deficits, high inflation and mounting debts culminated in 2001's economic crisis, which s

    parked protests, currency devaluation and debt defaults

    Sixty per cent of Argentinians were also pushed below the poverty line

    C

    ountry's main exports include soybeans, corn, wheat, petroleum, gas and vehicles

    Inflation is currently in double figures and farmers say recent tax increases on

    goods such as soybeans, sunflower oil and beef by up to 45 per cent to boost revenues will cripple their livelihoods

    Source: CIA World Factbook

    There was no immediate response from the government, which has repeatedly refused to meet the farmers while they are blocking transportation of farm goods.
     
    The strike was suspended on Friday night after Kirchner called for talks over their concerns about the increase of taxes on soya bean exports from 35 to 44.1 per cent.
     
    Half of Argentina's fertile farmland is used for soya bean cultivation, and the country is the biggest soya exporter in the world, sending $13bn worth annually to China, India, Southeast Asia and Europe.
     
    During the brief truce farmers allowed trucks with agricultural products to circulate and began negotiations at the government palace.
     
    But after five hours the negotiations ended in failure and the groups ordered a resumption of the protest that has paralysed exports from Argentina, a top world supplier of soya bean, corn, wheat and beef.
     
    Kirchner and other ministers had labelled the farmers "extortionists", and claimed that sky-high commodities prices on the world market, coupled with Argentina's devalued peso, have made many rural landowners very wealthy.
     
    But farmers complain the tax increase, combined with income taxes, transport costs and the high cost of land, would push many of them out of business.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    The woman who cleans up after 'lonely deaths' in Japan

    The woman who cleans up after 'lonely deaths' in Japan

    When somebody dies lonely and alone, Miyu Kojima steps in to clean their home and organise the mementos of their life.

    Putin and the 'triumph of Christianity' in Russia

    Putin and the 'triumph of Christianity' in Russia

    The rise of the Orthodox Church in Russia appears unstoppable, write filmmakers Glen Ellis and Viktoryia Kolchyna who went to investigate the close ties between the church and Putin.

    The chill effect: Is India's media running scared?

    The chill effect: Is India's media running scared?

    Much of India's media spurns a scoop about the son of PM Modi's right-hand man. Plus, NFL as platform for race politics.