[QODLink]
Americas
Mexico police clash with protesters
Officials use tear gas on those trying to block folk festival in Oaxaca city.
Last Modified: 17 Jul 2007 01:26 GMT
Police were accused of beating demonstrators
and roughing up reporters [Reuters]
Police have fired tear gas to prevent hundreds of leftist protesters from reaching the venue of an international folk festival in Oaxaca, in the worst violence in the Mexican city since November.
 
Protesters hurled rocks and burned vehicles on Monday as they sought to march to a stadium where the Guelaguetza festival is to be held on Sunday.
Police responded with tear gas and rocks.
 
Some protesters said they only wanted access to the stadium to hold an alternative, non-commercialised version of the festival, while others vowed to block the event entirely.

The picturesque city was paralysed by political upheaval for five months in 2006, when demonstrators seized control of the downtown and prevented the Guelaguetza festival from being held.


The state government has vowed to defend the stadium and put on this year's Guelaguetza, an annual weeklong celebration of Indian music, artisan crafts and cuisine that dates back to the 1700s and draws tens of thousands of tourists from around the world.

 

"About 200 people wearing masks and carrying sticks, stones and bottle rockets began to provoke the police," the Oaxaca state government said in a statement. "The police repelled the attack using tear gas."

 

Dozens detained

 

The Mexican League for the Defence of Human Rights accused police of "brutally beating" the demonstrators and roughing up several reporters.

 

Protesters hurled rocks and
burned vehicles [Reuters]
It said about seven people were detained, and witnesses said several were hit by flying rocks and tear gas canisters.

 

Sergio Segreste, the state public safety secretary, said 30 people were arrested and 15 policemen injured, but offered no information on injuries to protesters.

 

The unrest began as a teachers strike in May 2006, but quickly evolved into a broader protest as a coalition of leftist groups demanded that Oaxaca governor Ulises Ruiz be ousted.

 

Ruiz denies allegations of rigging his 2004 election and sending armed thugs to attack his enemies.

 

Twelve people were killed, mostly protesters shot by gunmen, before federal police retook the city centre in October.

 

There was a resurgence in protests on November 2, when holdouts manning barricades around a local university tossed petrol bombs at police, and dozens were injured.

 

In May, the National Human Rights Commission blamed both the authorities and protesters for "excesses" during the conflict.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Private citizens take initiative to help 'irregular' migrants, accusing governments of excessive focus on security.
Indonesia's cassava plantations are being killed by mealybugs, and thousands of wasps have been released to stop them.
Violence in Ain al-Arab has prompted many Kurdish Syrians to flee to Turkey, but others are returning to battle ISIL.
Unelected representatives quietly iron out logistics of massive TPP and TTIP deals among US, Europe, and Asia-Pacific.
Led by students concerned for their future with 'nothing to lose', it remains to be seen who will blink first.