[QODLink]
Americas
Castro misses Cuba assembly
The leader's empty chair greets delegates at the session of the national assembly.
Last Modified: 22 Dec 2006 22:26 GMT
Castro was last seen in public on July 26

The Cuban National Assembly has met for its year-end session without the ailing Fidel Castro.
 
Castro was last seen in public on July 26. Havana denies he is terminally ill, but Cuban officials no longer insist he will return as president of the country and leader of the party.
While Castro was not physically present, party members paid tribute to him.
 
"Dear comrade Fidel ... we are ready to obey your orders and guarantee your achievements with the faith in victory that you inspired in us," Jose Luis Rodriguez, economy minister, told the 502 delegates.

Empty seat

 

The seat usually occupied by the 80-year-old Castro in Havana's convention centre was empty at the opening meeting on Friday, which was led by his brother Raul Castro and other members of the island's Communist Party leadership.

 

Castro's prolonged absence has fuelled uncertainty about the future of the Western hemisphere's only communist state but party members seemed ready to move on.

   

"With Raul in charge, the revolution will continue to strengthen," said Enrique Gomez, a social worker at the National Assembly meeting.

   

Raul Castro, 75, the defence minister, took over the government temporarily on July 31 when emergency surgery forced his famous brother to relinquish power for the first time since Cuba's 1959 revolution.

   

Castro has been treated for an undisclosed illness. Video images released on October 28 showed the once towering revolutionary diminished to a frail and shuffling old man.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.
Public stripping and assault of woman and rival protests thereafter highlight Kenya's gender-relations divide.