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Zuma admitted to hospital for tests

Doctors express satisfaction with South African leader's condition, a statement on the presidency's website says.

Last updated: 07 Jun 2014 12:03
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The presidency had announced on Friday that Zuma would take a few days off from public appearances [AP]

South African President Jacob Zuma has been admitted to hospital for tests, the presidency said in a statement on its website.

"Doctors are satisfied with his condition," the statement said on Saturday.

The announcement came two weeks after Zuma was inaugurated for a second five-year term following the election victory last month of the ruling African National Congress party.

"Yesterday President Zuma was advised to rest following a demanding election and transition program to the new administration,'' his office said in a statement.

No further details were given.

In a separate statement on Friday, Zuma's office said the president would take a few days off from public engagements while continuing to perform official duties from home.

Zuma, a former anti-apartheid activist, was inaugurated May 24 in a ceremony marked by dance, prayer, a 21-gun salute and air force fly-overs.

In a speech, he said South Africa was a better place to live in than it was in 1994 but that poverty, unemployment and other problems persist.

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