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S Africa says rhino poaching is on the rise

Asian demand for rhino horn has fueled an intense onslaught on the animals.

Last updated: 17 Jan 2014 15:32
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A total of 37 rhino have been poached since the start of 2014 [Reuters]

More than 1,000 rhinos were poached in South Africa last year, a 50 percent increase from 2012, fuelled by the black-market demand for their horns, the government has said.

"The total number of rhino poached in South Africa during 2013 increased to 1,004," the environment ministry announced in a statement on Friday.

South Africa is home to around 80 percent of the world's rhino population, estimated at more than 25,000.

In 2007 only 13 rhinoceroses were reported hunted illegally in South Africa, but since then the numbers have increased exponentially every year.

Despite drone and foot patrols, poachers appear to stay ahead of the security forces.

Already a total of 37 rhino have been poached in the first two-and-half weeks of this year.

The famous Kruger National Park bordering Mozambique has taken the brunt of the poaching scourge.

Sophisticated transnational criminal organisations illegally hunt the animals and hack off their horns which are then smuggled out of the country to Asia.

A total of 343 arrests were made in the past year for poaching.

 

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Source:
AFP
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