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Egypt court acquits 155 protesters

Court dismisses charges of vandalism during October 6 protests in support of ousted President Mohamed Morsi.

Last updated: 08 Dec 2013 10:53
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A court in Alexandria also released 21 female protesters who previously sentenced to 11 years in jail [AP]

An Egyptian court has acquitted 155 people arrested during deadly clashes in the capital between Muslim Brotherhood protesters and police in October, state media reported.

The Cairo misdemeanuor court on Saturday dismissed the charges of assaulting policemen and vandalism over the October 6 clashes that killed almost 50 people, state-owned Al-Ahram newspaper reported on Sunday.

Released Egyptian woman recounts her ordeal

Also on Saturday, appeals courts in Alexandria ordered the release of 21 female protesters, including 14 women previously sentenced to up to 11 years in jail for a violent protest in the coastal city in support of ousted president Mohamed Morsi.

The defendants were held in custody for over a month and faced charges including "thuggery" and the use of weapons, the latter for allegedly having thrown rocks.

More than 1,000 people have been killed and thousands arrested in a police crackdown on Muslim Brotherhood supporters of Morsi following his overthrow in July.

Morsi and much of the leadership of his Muslim Brotherhood movement are now standing trial on charges of inciting violence during and after his turbulent one year in power.

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Source:
AFP
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