[QODLink]
Africa

CAR president promises return to security

Michael Djotodia says he is determined to restore security as violence continues to wreak havoc across country.

Last updated: 20 Nov 2013 13:44
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
The interim president is the first Muslim to lead the Christian-majority CAR [Reuters]

The Central African Republic's interim president has announced "exceptional measures" designed to quell violence by rebels.

The statement issued on Tuesday from Michel Djotodia's office did not provide details on the measures, but said that security was a priority for his administration.

"The president wants to assure the Central African people of his determination to hunt down all criminals, looters, troublemakers, human rights violators and their accomplices," the statement said.

"Exceptional measures are being taken to restore security," it said.

Since Djotodia seized power in a coup in March, the remnants of his Seleka rebel coalition have been sowing chaos across the vast nation.

Government forces are struggling to assert their authority beyond the capital Bangui.

[Violence in the CAR] threatens to degenerate into a countrywide religious and ethnic divide, with the potential to spiral into an uncontrollable situation

Ban Ki Moon

An under-funded and ill-equipped African force has made little impact so far.

Djotodia is the first Muslim president in the Christian-majority country and some of the recent deadly violence has had sectarian undertones.

On Tuesday, thousands of villagers fled clashes near the town of Bouca between former rebels and local militias, residents said, increasing concerns about growing violence between Muslims and Christians.

Ban Ki-moon, UN's Secretary General, said on Monday that one alternative to providing financial and logistical support to the African force was to send up to 9,000 UN peacekeepers.

In his report to the Security Council, Mr Ban said violence in the CAR "threatens to degenerate into a countrywide religious and ethnic divide, with the potential to spiral into an uncontrollable situation".

Human Rights Watch said the report clearly suggested that the African force - known as MISCA - was not up to the task and that "only a UN peacekeeping mission can avoid the worst case scenario."

325

Source:
Agencies
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
More than one-quarter of Gaza's population has been displaced, causing a humanitarian crisis.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Muslim charities claim discrimination after major UK banks began closing their accounts.
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Featured
Thousands of Houthi supporters have called for the fall of Yemen's government. But what do the Houthis really want?
New ration reductions and movement restrictions have refugees from Myanmar anxious about their future in Thailand.
US lawyers say poor translations of election materials disenfranchise Native voters.
US drones in Pakistan have killed thousands since 2004. How have leaders defended or decried these deadly planes?
Residents count the cost of violence after black American teenager shot dead by white Missouri police officer.
join our mailing list