[QODLink]
Africa

NATO to send security advisers to Libya

Alliance agrees to a request made by Libya PM to send security advisers in an effort to boost security in Tripoli.

Last Modified: 22 Oct 2013 02:17
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Libya's fragile government is crippled by infighting and unable to disarm former fighters [Reuters]

NATO has said it is sending advisers to Libya to help Tripoli strengthen its security set-up amid chaos and fears of civil war two years after the armed uprising against Muammar Gaddafi.

The alliance "agreed to respond positively to the request made by the Libyan prime minister for NATO to provide advice on defence institution building in Libya", Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen said on Monday.

The request for help was given added urgency by Zeidan's brief kidnapping by armed rebels this month. 

Two years after the violent death of Gaddafi in an armed uprising, Libya's fragile government is crippled by infighting and unable to disarm former fighters in a country awash with weapons from his four-decade rule.

The 28-nation alliance said it would set up a "small advisory team" to help Libya.

NATO provided few details about the mission or how many advisers would be involved, however a NATO source indicated to the Reuters news agency that their role would be to advise on strengthening the security forces rather than hands-on training.

The team will be based in Brussels and will not have a permanent presence in Libya, the source said.

NATO said its advisers would work closely with other international organisations and individual NATO members.

The alliance played a critical role in toppling Gaddafi, imposing a no-fly zone and using air power to try to prevent his forces attacking civilian areas held by rebels.

225

Source:
Agencies
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
Remnants of deadly demonstrations to be displayed in a new museum, a year after protests pushed president out of power.
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.