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Libya hands death penalty to ex-minister

Misrata judge finds Ahmed Ibrahim, education minister under Gaddafi, guilty of inciting violence during 2011 war.

Last Modified: 31 Jul 2013 18:09
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A criminal court in Libya's western city of Misrata has sentenced a former education minister to death for inciting violence during the 2011 civil war.

A judge on Wednesday found Ahmed Ibrahim guilty of gathering residents in deposed leader Muammar al-Gaddafi’s hometown of Sirte to form armed groups and fight the rebels that were seeking the Libyan ruler's ouster.

The judge also found him guilty of killing a man named Moftan Sadiq el-Sofrani after kidnapping him from a hospital, as well as giving orders to kidnap and kill five other people from the el-Sofrani family.

The el-Sofrani family's lawyer, Salim Dans, told the Associated Press news agency that the case will be sent to Libya's Supreme Court, which will either accept the initial sentencing or accept an appeal, if filed.

Ibrahim also was convicted of spreading false news through the local radio station and terrorising and demoralizing the public.

According to Libyan law, he will be executed by a firing squad. No timeframe was given.

Gaddafi was captured by rebel forces in October 2011 and killed.

A few days ago, the same court in Misrata sentenced Masnour Al-Daw Gaddafi to death for his role in the civil war.

He belongs to the Gaddafi family and was a top security chief of one of Libya's most-hated security bodies called the Popular Guard. He also had been captured by rebels.

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Source:
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