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Spanish aid workers kidnapped in Kenya freed

Two aid workers abducted nearly two years ago while working in Dadaab refugee camp are released in neighbouring Somalia.

Last Modified: 18 Jul 2013 20:00
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Monserrat Serra and Blanca Thiebaut were working in Dadaab refuge camp when they were kidnapped [AFP]

Two Spanish aid workers who were kidnapped while working at the Dadaab refugee camp in eastern Kenya in October 2011, Montserrat Serra and Blanca Thiebaut, have been freed in Somalia, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) have said.

The two were working near the Somali border for the aid agency when they were kidnapped, in the same month that Kenya sent troops across the border into Somalia in pursuit of al-Shabaab militants.

"Both are safe and healthy and keen to join their loved ones as soon as possible," MSF said in a statement on Thursday.

The agency said it was still working to return the two aid workers home, promising to offer further details on their release at a news conference on Friday.

"MSF strongly condemns this attack on humanitarian workers who were in Dadaab offering lifesaving medical assistance to thousands of refugees," the agency said.

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