[QODLink]
Africa

'Dozens killed’ in Darfur mine collapse

Officials say more than 60 killed when a gold mine in Sudan's western Darfur region collapsed on Monday.

Last Modified: 03 May 2013 09:56
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

More than 60 miners have been killed this week in Sudan's Darfur region when the gold mine they were working in collapsed, officials said.

A member of parliament from the area said the mine collapsed on Monday, and word had only reached Khartoum on Thursday.

Police spokesperson Ahmed Amr said fighting had broken out in January between two tribes over access to the mine in the Jebel Amir area of North Darfur, and authorities had closed it after several people were killed in the violence. It had since reopened.

A witness told the Reuters news agency by phone that rescue efforts had failed.

Half a million artisan miners have joined a gold rush across Sudan, according to the government, which estimates it made $2.5bn from gold exports last year.

Law and order has collapsed in most parts of Darfur, an arid region in Sudan's west, since mainly non-Arab rebels took up arms in 2003 against the government.

Despite the presence of the world's largest peacekeeping mission, UNAMID, fighting between Sudan's army and rebels has continued since then, alongside banditry and tribal clashes.

182

Source:
Agencies
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
As Snowden awaits Russian visa renewal, the world mulls role of NSA and expects more revelations from document trove.
A handful of agencies that provide tours to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea say business is growing.
A political power struggle masquerading as religious strife grips Nigeria - with mixed-faith couples paying the price.
The current surge in undocumented child migrants from Central America has galvanized US anti-immigration groups.
Absenteeism among doctors at government hospitals is rife, prompting innovative efforts to ensure they turn up for work.
join our mailing list