[QODLink]
Africa

US officially recognises Somalia government

Washington had not recognised a Somali government since warlords toppled dictator Mohamed Siad Barre in 1991.
Last Modified: 18 Jan 2013 01:19
US recognition will help Somalia receive greater assistance from US and international aid agencies [AFP]

The United States has recognised Somalia's government for the first time in more than two decades.

Hillary Rodham Clinton, the US secretary of state, made the announcement on Thursday alongside Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud.

President Barack Obama was reported by the AP news agency as having met privately with the Somali leader at the White House.

Washington had not recognised a Somali government since warlords toppled dictator Mohamed Siad Barre in 1991.

American intervention failed two years later after militants shot down two US helicopters and killed 18 American
servicemen.

Clinton said times have changed, citing the armed group al-Shabab's retreat from every major Somali city. The US provided $780m to African forces to help that effort.

The White House also expressed optimism about Somalia's future and pledged to work with the country's new government to promote peace and security, improve the economy and boost social services.

Obama also urged his Somali counterpart to "seize this unique opportunity to turn the page on two decades of civil strife", according to a White House statement.

Recognition will help Somalia receive greater assistance from US and international aid agencies. Clinton also spoke about re-establishing an embassy in Somalia in the future.

205

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.